Category Archives: Asian Cuisine

Kilawin na Isda or Kinilaw

Just looking at the photos makes me want to eat more kilawin or kinilaw na isda. One can use either tuna or lapu-lapu fillets to make this dish. I always associate the Kinilaw with a beach outing. Preparing dishes with vinegar ensures there is little chance of food spoilage. The fish is “cooked” using vinegar as the meat turnes opaque in color. Though kinilaw may not be as popular as adobo, it certainly has a one-of-a-kind taste that many Pinoys abroad crave for.

In Philippine Food and Life (released by Anvil Publishing in 1992), Gilda Cordero-Fernando narrates of an Ilokano group who, during the Spanish period, were part of the crew English navigator Thomas Cavendish’s ship. Right after the sailors threw all the intestines of a goat into the sea, the Ilokano assistants dived into the sea for their kilawin — dipped or cooked in bile sauce or broth. The chronicler, who was ignorant of what the Pinoys were preparing, described the dish as “a disgusting mess.”

Not only goats, which is believed to be a good source of protein and calcium, however, may be made into kilawin. Beef, carabeef, fish, shelfish, including octopus are also popular options.

(Sources: Alegre, Edilberto N. and Fernandez, Doreen G. “Kinilaw: A Philippine Cuisine of Freshness.” Bookmark Inc.,1991;Cordero, Gilda Fernando. “Philippine Food and Life.” Pasig City: Anvil Publishing, 1992)

Kilawin na isda is so easy to prepare too.

Here are the ingredients:

Continue reading Kilawin na Isda or Kinilaw

Satay

Satay

I am sure you want to learn recipes from other countries. One of my favorite Singapore dish in the 2010 Singapore Food Festival is Satay. It is skewered barbecued meat, usually chicken (Satay Ayam), beef (Satay Lembu) and mutton (Satay Kambing), dipped and eaten with a delectable peanut sauce. Satay originated from Indonesia but also popular in many other Southeast Asian countries, such as: Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, Thailand, the southern Philippines and in the Netherlands, as Indonesia is a former Dutch colony.

INGREDIENTS

For satay:
1/2 cup soy sauce
1 large onion, chopped
1 stalk lemongrass, minced
1 tablespoon peanut oil
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 1/2 teaspoons brown sugar
1 fresh ginger, peeled and sliced
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
1 kilo chicken or beef, sliced into 2-inch portions
Bamboo skewers

For peanut sauce:
1/2 cup salted roasted peanuts
1 medium onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 stalk lemongrass
Vegetable oil
1 cup coconut milk
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 teaspoon brown sugar
2 teaspoon dried tamarind, soaked
1 teaspoon salt
Continue reading Satay

Traditional Braised Duck

singapore-heavenly-chefs

During the Singapore food festival 2010, I had the pleasure of meeting the Heavenly chefs (Mr Sin Leong and Mr Hooi Kok Wai of Dragon Phoenix and Red Star Restaurant) to showcase three very authentic and old school Cantonese dishes not popularly found today in menu menus like the Shunde Wild Pheasant , the Deep Fried Golden Pearls and a good old traditional braised duck. These recipes are not for beginners but of course you can try them.

Origin of the traditional braised duck
braised-duck

In Canton province of China, during festivals such as Cheng Ming, harvesting, etc., people used to gather in the ancestral hall to celebrate and thanks their ancestors for blessings given.

On such occasions, foods such as roast duck, roast meat, chicken etc., were brought as offerings. After some prayers, all these foods were placed into a big pot and stewed into a pot-luck delicacy where people gather around sharing the joy of the occasion.

Such practices initiated the creation of the famous Cantonese Dish “Peng Cai”. The “Traditional Braised Duck” is one of these “Peng Cai” dishes which uses duck as the main ingredient.
Besides offering a harmonic combination of textures and flavors, this dish has a symbolic cultural significance as it symbolized unity and the sharing of joy. In the 40s, this dish was “migrated” together with a group of Cantonese immigrant into Singapore and became a popular dish in Chinese banquets.
Continue reading Traditional Braised Duck

Sambal Goreng Udang (Chilli Prawn)

Sambal Goreng Udang (Chilli Prawn)I promised that I’d share Singapore Food recipes from the chefs in Singapore. Now this Chilli Prawn recipe called Sambal Goreng Udang is so simple.

Here is a recipe shared by Singaporean Chef Veni Knight

Ingredients

500gm large prawns, remove heads and veins but leave shells intact
2 tbsp of chilli powder (You can easily buy these at the supermarket)
2 large onions, sliced
Salt to taste
3 tbsp cooking oil

Method
1. Mix prawns with chilli powder
2. Heat oil in the wok
3. Add the prawns and stir on high heat
4. When the prawns have all turned red, stir in the onions
5. Let the onions soften slightly before putting the fire out
6. Serve hot