Crispy Pork Dinuguan or Crispy Pork Blood Stew

Jan 14

dinuguan
Crispy Dinuguan? I first tasted Crispy Dinuguan in Kanin Club at the Paseo de Santa Rosa, Santa Rosa Laguna. It’s located near our country home, just after the Laguna Technopark, along the Santa Rosa road that leads up to Tagaytay. This is dinuguan with a twist and thought I’d recreate this dish for the family. Crispy Dinuguan tastes like your ordinary dinuguan except that the pork is cooked like the Crispy Lechon Kawali way.

So this recipe will be divided into two parts, the preparation of Lechon Kawali and then the Dinuguan.

Please don’t cook this dish frequently. The dish is a sure-fire recipe to clogged arteries.

Let’s start with Lechon Kawali

3/4 kilo pork pork belly (or liempo)
4 garlic cloves, crushed
2 bay leaves
1 teaspoon peppercorns
salt
water, for boiling
oil (for deep fat frying)

Instructions for cooking Lechon Kawali

1. Cut the pork belly into serving pieces.

2. Mix crushed garlic, peppercorn, bay leaf, salt and water in a sauce pan.

3. Boil and simmer until skin is tender, around 30 to 40 minutes.

4. Drain, cool and dry well before frying to minimize splatters.

5. Deep fry the pork belly pieces until golden brown and the blisters show on the skin. Set aside.

Let’s now prepare for the Dinuguan

Cooked Lechon Kawali (see above)
1/4 kilo minced pork liver
2/3 cup native vinegar
1 large onion, chopped
1/2 teaspoon crushed peppercorn
1 small garlic, minced
1/2 cup pork blood (refrigerate until ready to use)
1 1/2 cups water
2 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon patis
2 large hot peppers (siling haba not labuyo)
salt to taste

Puto as side dish

Let’s cook the dinuguan

1. Chop coagulated blood. Mince the liver and season with a little salt. Set aside separately.

2. Mix vinegar, onion, pepper, and pork blood all together in a sauce pan. Blend well and bring to a boil.

3. As soon as the mixture is boiling, add water, sugar and patis.

4. Drop in the minced liver and hot peppers to the mixture. Simmer for 5 more minutes then add the Lechon Kawali. Mix just enough to coat the Lechon Kawali pieces. Don’t overcook or the crispiness will be gone.

5. Add salt to taste but this is optional. Remember the Lechon Kawali is already salty and may make the dinuguan even saltier.

Note that the dinuguan consistency depends on your preference. For Crispy Dinuguan, I prefer it to have a thick consistency like the photo shown above.

Best served with puto or plain rice.

Serves 6

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Noemi Lardizabal-Dado (358 Posts)

Noemi, Editor of Blog Watch and features editor of Philippine Online Chronicles is a 55 year old mother to three kids and is married to Atty. Luis H. Dado. She loves being a full time mother and homemaker after retiring as a Researcher/Consultant from the UP Institute for Small Scale Industries in 1987. Now that her children are all college graduates, she devotes her time to grief support, blogging, new media events and using her blogs to promote online advocacies. Her personal blog is at aboutmyrecovery.com, which garnered numerous awards such as Best Website, Blog Category during the 9th and 10th Philippine Web Awards. Her blog also won in the Blog- Personal Category of the DigitalFilipino.com Web Awards 2007 and Globelines Broadband Family Blog Award (in honor of family-oriented blogging) 2007 Philippine Blog Award. Globe also recognized her as Digital Elder in the 2009 Philippine Blog Award.


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  • jayneh

    I love the real taste of this pork barbeque!just so perfect!

  • mel

    Dear Ms. Noemi,
    I’ll try your dinuguan with a twist. Can you please post a recipe on putong puti. I’ve tried to follow the recipe I’ve read here on the net, using rice flour but eventually the result is not putong puti, it came out to be tikoy instead. It’s wet and not fluffy and really sticky. LOL. Putong puti is best eaten with dinuguan. Thank you in advance.

  • chili

    Thanks for the recipe! I’ve been looking for months for a crispy dinuguan, I used to have this when I was a kid and was in region 2, but when I moved to manila, I never this type of dinuguan again, it’s also good if you mix it with fried bituka ng baboy..I’m excited to try your recipe! I plan to mix it with crispy pork ears and bituka, I’ll post a new message when I get to try it.=)

    Just a question, do you usually put liver on your usual dinuguan, or is it only for this type, to thicken the sauce?

    TY=)

  • lynn

    thanks for the recipe, i think this will be the best fried dinuguan i ever tasted,

  • Vic Suntay

    first time I’ve heard of CRISPY DINUGUAN but it sure looks delicious! thank you for sharing this guys and yes, it does sound “DEADLY”arteries clogging cholesterols. Thank you for the warning…eat at your own risk.

  • Edwin

    I’m enjoying this dish at home right now, thanks to my auntie who took it home from one of the restaurants inside the Ayala Triangle park. It’s just OK for me, nothing great about it. I still very much prefer the regular version of dinuguan.