Category Archives: Pork

Adobo rice, anyone?

There are a 100 ways to cook adobo . Each one of us has our own version. I shared some tips in cooking adobo as well. There is the recipe on adobo flakes, adobong puti and the classic adobo recipe.  Then there is the Adobo rice, the classic fried rice with crispy adobo flakes and sauce shared by XO46 Heritage Bistro, at the Maya Kitchen demo. This is so simple:

adobo rice1

You will need the following:

¼ kg cooked adobo with sauce
1 kg cooked rice
1 piece salted egg
onion leeks, as needed for garnishing

How to do it:

1. Chop or shred cooked adobo.
2. Mix with rice and sauce.
3. Top with salted egg and onion leeks.

It reminds me of those Chinese meals with the viand on top of the rice.

Juicy Pork Chop Inihaw and Smoked Lumpiang Shanghai

I love cooking with Lea Perrins worcestershire sauce and Heinz Catsup. I just discovered the greatness of Heinz Catsup recently when I was invited by Tess Laurente to Maya Kitchen. My love for Heinz Catsup came about when I got introduced to Pork Spareribs with Paprika Tomato Sauce. It was such a hit on the dinner table that it is a mainstay in her our list of frequently cooked dishes. Even as a condiment , I like the perfect balance of sweetness and sourness with a touch of tanginess that is unique to Heinz.

I used to be hesitant in endorsing brands but I found out that it can lead me to better tasting products. Why shouldn’t I share the glory to my readers?

I once wrote about Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce as a childhood memory in Cebu. When I first shared Lea & Perrins Worcestershire in Twitter, I was amazed at the reaction from two followers. My two friends actually bring Lea & Perrins tuck in their bag or in the car trunk whenever they dine in restaurants just in case they don’t serve it. After seeing those anecdotes, I stopped being squeamish about sharing brands.

I am proud to share two recipes from Lea and Perrins and Heinz Catsup. These recipes are old favorites and a little variation maybe something that will interest you.

Take a look at the Juicy Pork Chop Inihaw and Smoked Lumpiang Shanghai recipes.

Juicy Pork Chop Inihaw

Preparation time: 1 hour; Cooking time:15 minutes; Serves: 5

Ingredients

5 pcs pork chop
1 Tbsp garlic, crushed
1/2 tsp whole black peppercorn, crushed
1 Tbsp brown sugar
5 Tbsp Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce
10 Tbsp Heinz Tomato Ketchup
10 Tbsp pineapple Juice
1/2 tsp salt

Procedure

1. Marinate pork chops in garlic, crushed black pepper corn, brown sugar, Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce, Heinz Tomato Ketchup, pineapple juice and salt for an hour in the refrigerator.

2. Charbroil till done. Serve with freshly cooked garlic rice and Heinz Tomato Ketchup.

Smoked Lumpiang Shanghai

This is so good with the flavors of smoked bangus and wansoy.

Preparation time: 30 minutes; Cooking time: 30 minutes; Serves: 4-6

Ingredients

2 pcs tinapang bangus, finely shredded
2 medium-sized onions chopped finely
2 Tbsp Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce
1 small bar quick melt cheese, cut into small cubes
1 bunch wansoy, finely chopped
1 pc mango, half-ripe, finely diced
salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
lumpia wrappers
1 egg white

Procedure

1. Mix first 6 ingredients in a bowl.

2. Place a few tablespoons of mixture into lumpia wrappers and roll.

3. Use egg white as glue for wrapper ends when rolling.

4. Deep fry till golden brown.

Serve with Heinz Tomato Ketchup.

About Heinz Ketchup

Heinz Tomato Ketchup is grown, not made. The brand follows the Seed-to-Table process that demands utmost care and quality control from seeding, growing, processing and delivery of the finished product. It contains no modified starch, no artificial color and flavouring.

Introduced by HenryJohn Heinz in 1876, Heinz Tomato Ketchup has more than 140 years of tomato ketchup making tradition and is now sold in more than 90 countries worldwide. Make sure your family gets only that ‘perfect blend, perfect taste’ that only Heinz Tomato Ketchup can give.

To know more about Heinz Tomato Ketchup, log on to www.heinz.com

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Kiam Pung: Chinese traditional salted rice with mustard

kiam-pung9
If you like to cook paella, you will love Kiam Pung. The Kiam Pung looks interesting to me because of its similarity to Paella which I love to prepare. The green mustard leaves adds color to the otherwise drab brown colors of the adobo-looking mixture. The Japanese rice is much better than the malagkit rice that some recipes call for in paella.

Remember, the quantity of the ingredients should suit your personal preference and taste.

Here are the ingredients:

1 kilo pork liempo cut to cubes
1 kiko chicken cut to cubes
10 shitake mushrooms, dried (wash and soak in water, remove stems and cut into half)

1/4 cup sugar (to caramelize)

2 tablespoons large dried shirmps (hebe) soaked in warm water

1/4 cup or so Shallots (tagalog sibuyas)

Garlic

1/4 cup soy sauce

Japanese rice -soaked at least for 3 hours

Mustard leaves

Chinese sausages

Procedure

1. Heat oil in a pan. Caramelize 1/4 cup sugar. Stir until sugar turns into caramel color and becomes dark and bubbling. Turn heat to low.

2. add garlic, pork liempo, chicken and shitake mushrooms.

3. Pour in soy sauce. Add water until the level is a few inches above the pork and chicken. Cook over high heat till boiling. Cook for about an hour.

4. Remove from pan and remove the pork, chicken and mushrooms in another bowl. Separate sauce.

5. In a big wok, heat 1/2 cup oil. Saute the shallots till golden brown, followed by the hebe.

6. Add the Japanese rice and fry for a while. Pour in the sauce left from Step 4, with a proportion of 1:2 /1 cup of rice to 2 cups of liquid water and caramelized sauce. Mix well. Remove and to let cool.

7. Add in mustard. Cook till the rice is done.

Now that wasn’t hard, right? It also reminds me of adobo rice. The Kiam Pung is really tasty as the rice absorbed the seasonings of the sauce.

Stuffed Rolled Lechon Belly aka Cebu Lechon

To always remember, utilize and propagate native ingredients and to continuously cook Filipino dishes are some of the most important messages of Chef Michael Giovan Sarthou III in his recent demo for The Maya Kitchen Culinary Elite Series. Known as a culinary heritage advocate, Chef Tatung showed his audience how to cook Stuffed Rolled Lechon Belly among many other recipes.

stuffed-rolled-lechon-belly

I am sure you have heard of the famous Cebu Lechon . As a Cebuano, no one makes lechon like we do. No worries, you can cook  rolled pork belly lechon stuffed with the flavors of Cebu. Here is the recipe shared by Chef Tatung:

Serves 12

3 kilos whole pork belly, deboned, preferably a wide slab that can be rolled. annatto oil, for brushing

Marinade:

2 cups pineapple juice

3 tablespoons sea salt

6 cloves garlic, crushed

Stuffing:

salt and pepper, to taste

2 cloves garlic, sliced

2 cups onion leeks, white and green parts, sliced

1. Marinate pork belly in pineapple, salt and garlic for at least 3 hours or overnight. You may want to poke holes in the inside of the pork belly to allow marinade to seep into the meat.

2. To roll pork belly, first discard marinating liquid. Lay the pork on a board, skin-side down. Rub with salt and pepper. Then arrange garlic and leeks on top of the pork. Neatly roll the meat along the grain of the pork until the ends meet. Tie the joint tightly with butcher’s string at regular intervals to hold the roll together.

3. Preheat the oven to 250°C/475°F, or as high as it will go.

4. Place rolled belly on an oiled roasting tray. Roast for 30 minutes to brown and crisp the skin. Then bring down oven temperature to 177°C/350°F and roast for another 2 hours. Brush with annatto oil every now and then.

5. When pork is cooked, carve into slices. Serve with vinegar on the side.