Chasing Flavors with Chef Claude Tayag

Chef Claude Tayag: Chasing Flavors on SKYcable channel 52

I must admit that when my sister, Noemi Dado, Pinoy Food Blog’s visionary, asked me if I could attend the Press Launch for “Chasing Flavors,” Lifestyle TV Philippines’ newest show that premieres on Saturday, June 3, 2017, 9:00 pm, on SKYcable channel 52, I did not hesitate, enthusiastic co-blogger that I am. Chef Claude Tayag, the “rock star” chef of CHASING FLAVORS, was a bleep in my foodie universe. I had seen one of Uber-Chef Anthony Bourdain’s TV shows that showcased some of the Philippines’ most popular cuisines. Chef Claude (pronounced as “Cloud”) was one of the resource persons featured in one episode.

Generally, I prepare for a writing assignment with some research on my subject. This time, I decided to come in cold. Although I am a corn-fed and raised Cebuana/Filipina, I sought to experience this adventure from an Overseas Filipina’s point of view. I texted my former managing editor from Filipinas Magazine, Gemma Nemenzo, who is one of PositivelyFilipino.com’s prime movers, to find out if she knew Chef Claude. Gemma replied, “Yes, we had him as a special guest at the 2013 Filipino American International Book Festival. Please give my regards!”

I have also tasted the cuisine of Pampanga yet I never made an effort to study its finer nuances. Noemi gave me Chef Claude’s book, “Food Tour,” a culinary journal, so I could ask the chef to autograph it. “It’s a gift from my husband,” Noemi told me.

Page 2 of the book, “He Said, She Said,” captured my attention. Claude’s tongue-in-cheek humor was so familiar, something I could relate to. During a group interview at the press launch, when I found out that both of us shared the same alma mater, the University of the Philippines, Claude became the typical alumnus. He asked me, “What’s your student number?” We broke out in laughter when we found out that we had the same first two digits of our student numbers, i.e. we belonged to the same generation. But I am digressing… Moving along!

The blog post is categorized accordingly:

1. A video slide show of Pinoy Food Blog’s experience during the Press Launch of CHASING FLAVORS (almost seven minutes of “show and tell”)
2. A documentation of the Press Launch’s activities, including Chef Claude Tayag’s food demonstrations of Lechon Tacos and Lechon Sisig, anecdotes, and morsels (no pun intended) of culinary history and information
3. A supplementary content curation of post-press launch research on videos and articles about Chef Claude Tayag

I also made an effort to place asterisks (*) on Filipino terms to help the uninitiated cook in the Filipino kitchen.

Thank you to Earl Moreno, Digital Marketing Executive of Creative Programs, Inc. (part of the ABS-CBN family), for inviting PinoyFoodBlog.com to the Press Launch.

Dacal a salamat, Kayabe!

Lorna Lardizabal Dietz
For Pinoy Food Blog

HIGH RESOLUTION VIDEO: Press Launch of CHASING FLAVORS

Continue reading Chasing Flavors with Chef Claude Tayag

Adobo rice, anyone?

There are a 100 ways to cook adobo . Each one of us has our own version. I shared some tips in cooking adobo as well. There is the recipe on adobo flakes, adobong puti and the classic adobo recipe.  Then there is the Adobo rice, the classic fried rice with crispy adobo flakes and sauce shared by XO46 Heritage Bistro, at the Maya Kitchen demo. This is so simple:

adobo rice1

You will need the following:

¼ kg cooked adobo with sauce
1 kg cooked rice
1 piece salted egg
onion leeks, as needed for garnishing

How to do it:

1. Chop or shred cooked adobo.
2. Mix with rice and sauce.
3. Top with salted egg and onion leeks.

It reminds me of those Chinese meals with the viand on top of the rice.

Juicy Pork Chop Inihaw and Smoked Lumpiang Shanghai

I love cooking with Lea Perrins worcestershire sauce and Heinz Catsup. I just discovered the greatness of Heinz Catsup recently when I was invited by Tess Laurente to Maya Kitchen. My love for Heinz Catsup came about when I got introduced to Pork Spareribs with Paprika Tomato Sauce. It was such a hit on the dinner table that it is a mainstay in her our list of frequently cooked dishes. Even as a condiment , I like the perfect balance of sweetness and sourness with a touch of tanginess that is unique to Heinz.

I used to be hesitant in endorsing brands but I found out that it can lead me to better tasting products. Why shouldn’t I share the glory to my readers?

I once wrote about Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce as a childhood memory in Cebu. When I first shared Lea & Perrins Worcestershire in Twitter, I was amazed at the reaction from two followers. My two friends actually bring Lea & Perrins tuck in their bag or in the car trunk whenever they dine in restaurants just in case they don’t serve it. After seeing those anecdotes, I stopped being squeamish about sharing brands.

I am proud to share two recipes from Lea and Perrins and Heinz Catsup. These recipes are old favorites and a little variation maybe something that will interest you.

Take a look at the Juicy Pork Chop Inihaw and Smoked Lumpiang Shanghai recipes.

Juicy Pork Chop Inihaw

Preparation time: 1 hour; Cooking time:15 minutes; Serves: 5

Ingredients

5 pcs pork chop
1 Tbsp garlic, crushed
1/2 tsp whole black peppercorn, crushed
1 Tbsp brown sugar
5 Tbsp Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce
10 Tbsp Heinz Tomato Ketchup
10 Tbsp pineapple Juice
1/2 tsp salt

Procedure

1. Marinate pork chops in garlic, crushed black pepper corn, brown sugar, Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce, Heinz Tomato Ketchup, pineapple juice and salt for an hour in the refrigerator.

2. Charbroil till done. Serve with freshly cooked garlic rice and Heinz Tomato Ketchup.

Smoked Lumpiang Shanghai

This is so good with the flavors of smoked bangus and wansoy.

Preparation time: 30 minutes; Cooking time: 30 minutes; Serves: 4-6

Ingredients

2 pcs tinapang bangus, finely shredded
2 medium-sized onions chopped finely
2 Tbsp Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce
1 small bar quick melt cheese, cut into small cubes
1 bunch wansoy, finely chopped
1 pc mango, half-ripe, finely diced
salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
lumpia wrappers
1 egg white

Procedure

1. Mix first 6 ingredients in a bowl.

2. Place a few tablespoons of mixture into lumpia wrappers and roll.

3. Use egg white as glue for wrapper ends when rolling.

4. Deep fry till golden brown.

Serve with Heinz Tomato Ketchup.

About Heinz Ketchup

Heinz Tomato Ketchup is grown, not made. The brand follows the Seed-to-Table process that demands utmost care and quality control from seeding, growing, processing and delivery of the finished product. It contains no modified starch, no artificial color and flavouring.

Introduced by HenryJohn Heinz in 1876, Heinz Tomato Ketchup has more than 140 years of tomato ketchup making tradition and is now sold in more than 90 countries worldwide. Make sure your family gets only that ‘perfect blend, perfect taste’ that only Heinz Tomato Ketchup can give.

To know more about Heinz Tomato Ketchup, log on to www.heinz.com

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Heritage recipe: Mechado ni Lola Asiang

Every family has their own heritage recipe passed down from generation to generation. The women of the Reyes culinary clan shared some of their heritage recipes at The Maya Kitchen recently. Nancy Reyes Lumen, a well known chef, author and TV personality showed how to cook ‘Mechado’ the Lola Asiang way with tons of over ripe tomatoes and shallots.

Mechado ni Lola Asiang

Mechado follows the traditional method of “threading strips of pork back-fat through thick pieces of cheaper lean beef to render them more tender and less dry.” It is for that reason that the word mechado from the Spanish mecha meaning wick.

The larded pieces of beef are then marinated in vinegar, soy sauce, calamansi juice, crushed garlic, black pepper and bay leaf, browned quickly on all sides in hot oil or lard, and then slowly braised in its marinade with the addition of soup stock, onion slices, and tomato sauce until tender and the liquid is reduced to a thick flavorful gravy.

The method of cooking Mechado below is different from the Spanish practice but is just as delicious. Try it in your kitchen.

1 kilo kampto (flank), cubed
1 tablespoon each of patis, toyo and vinegar
olive oil, as much as needed (usually 500ml bottle)
½ pack achuete powder
1 ½ kilo shallots, chopped
3 kilos or more of over ripe tomatoes, seeded
500 grams garlic, minced
¼ cup tomato paste
1 finger panocha

Only if needed (depending on how much fat is in the beef):
1-2 cups beef or chicken broth

It is best to use two big pans in cooking this dish.

1. Marinate the beef in patis, toyo and vinegar.
2. Marinate for 4-6 hours.
3. Heat some olive oil and achuete powder to become orange in color.
4. Braise the beef in the oil until dark brown on all sides.

5. In another pan, heat olive oil and achuete powder. Sauté the shallots until very soft.
6. Meanwhile, crush the tomatoes by hand to release juices and skins.
7. Add in the tomatoes and cook until almost like paste and the skins curl.
8. Add the garlic and cook another 10 minutes.
9. Season according to taste.

10. Add tomato paste and beef and the juices.
11.Cook on high until boiling, and then use the smallest flame possible.
12. Cook covered until beef is very tender.
13. Taste and adjust seasonings again: salt and peppercorn.
14. Add in panocha and cover again.
15. Simmer until tender.

*If you want a less thick sauce, add more olive oil or a little broth while cooking.
*Use only very very ripe tomatoes that you can easily crush with your hands. This is what will make it sweet.
*If the tomatoes are not so ripe and soft, and may be a bit acidic, then use the panocha to balance the taste.
*canned tomatoes can be used
*you can cook large batches of sofrito then freeze for future use

For more information, log on to www.themayakitchen.com or [email protected]

Pinoy Cooking, Filipino Food and other Food Recipes