Menudo Sulipena1

Menudo Sulipeña (Oxtail Stew)

Menudo Sulipena1

Ever heard of Menudo Sulipeña , a slow simmered dish of oxtail, ham and Chorizo Bilbao with a dash of brandy . Cooking menudo at home is just plain pork, potatos, carrots with a sprinkling of raisins. Yes, Menudo or “little stew” refers to a common, everyday dish of slow-simmered bits of a variety of meats. Some use tripe (in Mexican menudo), or ground or cubed pork mixed with potatoes. In Pampanga, common menudo is never complete without tidbits of liver or heart. Menudo Sulipeña however, is an oxtail stew or braise decadent enough to grace a banquet. The dish reflects the extravagance of that time though it carries the “humble” name, menudo.

Purchase the oxtail from a reputable dealer because strong, undesirable odors are often present in improperly cleaned or processed oxtails.

Chef Gene Gonzalez’ shares one of the culinary Gems from Old Pampanga at a recent demo at the Maya Kitchen.

~1 kilo oxtail cleaned and washed
~ 2 tablespoons butter
~ 3 tablespoons olive oil
~ 1 head garlic, chopped
~ 1 medium onion, chopped
~ 1 red pepper, seeded and roasted
~ 1 green pepper, seeded and roasted
~ Dash of paprika picante
~ ½ cup ham, cubed
~ ½ cup sliced chorizo Bilbao (Spanish sausage)
~ 1 cup tomato sauce
~ 1 tablespoon tomato paste
~ 1 tablespoon cooked garbanzos (chick peas)
~ 1 tablespoon Spanish brandy
~ Salt and pepper

1) Pressure cook oxtail 20-25 minutes or simmer with enough water to cover until tender. Debone and cut into ½- inch cubes. Set the stock aside.

2) In a casserole, heat butter and olive oil. Sauté garlic and onion, then add red and green peppers and paprika. Stir fry 2-3 minutes. Add oxtail, ham, chorizo, tomato sauce and tomato paste. Add stock and simmer over low fire about 10 minutes. Add garbanzos and brandy. Season with salt and pepper.

Serves 6

For more information, log on to www.themayakitchen.com or e-mail [email protected]

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Adobo del Diablo or capampangan adobo

Capampangan Adobo or Adobo del Diablo

Chef Gene Gonzalez prepared Adobo del Diablo (Capampangan Adobo) at The Maya Kitchen Culinary Elite Series .

Adobo del Diablo or capampangan adobo

The Capampangan Adobo is produced by constant simmering and deglazing of the pan with stock when a crust is formed. This tasty caramelized stock is brought back to the meats to give the deep reddish brown hue.

Other areas would simply darken their adobo with soy sauce which is a crime in the Capampangan household. Uh-oh, this is what I often do. This tip from Chef Gonzales is such a revelation that I will soon shift to using caramelized stock. Imagine if I lived in Pampanga. In fact, the Sulipan barrio will talk and gossip about the bad homemaker that puts soy sauce in her adobo and pity the hardworking provider of the house.

Here is the recipe

~ 1 ½ cups pork, cut into 1” cubes
~ 1 ½ cups chicken, cut in 3” pieces
~ ½ cup chicken heart
~ ½ cup beef liver, cut into ¼” cubes
~ ½ cup pork kidney, cut into 1” cubes
~ ½ chicken giblets, cleaned
~ ¼ cup chicken blood, cut into 1” cubes
~ ½ cup vinegar
~ 2 tablespoons corn oil
~ 1/2 tablespoon cracked pepper
~ 2 tablespoons garlic
~ ¾ tablespoons salt
~ 6 tablespoons fish sauce
~ 3 tablespoons pork lard
~ 2 cups chicken stock

1) Sauté garlic in corn oil until slightly brown. Add pork cubes, chicken, chicken heart, beef liver, pork kidney, beef liver, chicken giblets and chicken blood.

2) Add vinegar, pepper then fish sauce.

3) Take-out chicken giblets and heart, beef liver and chicken blood. Continue braising. When brown crust forms and meat turn brown douse with a little stock and deglaze. Return brown colored liquid to the meat and continue until crust forms again. Repeat deglazing with stock about 3 our times.

4) Add all variety meats when chicken and pork are tender and sauce turns brown. When stock is added.

5) Simmer for 15 minutes or until dry then separate meats.

6) Deglaze pan with stock. Serve the sauce on the side and meats separately.

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march cooking classes

The Maya Kitchen’s March classes on basics of baking & cooking plus specialty courses

Even if I know how to bake and cook, it doesn’t stop me from learning new recipes. As a young mother, I learned how to ice and decorate cakes at the Maya Kitchen . With that training, I was able to prepare a customized birthday cakes for my kids. I can still remember their shrieks of delight whenever I brought out their cakes.

march cooking classes

Fast forward….many years later, my two girls decided to live independently. I thought they needed basic culinary courses even if they already knew some dishes.  I wanted them to know the basics of food preparation. I didn’t want them to buy food or get lazy because they didn’t know how to cook. Good thing, Maya Kitchen offered basic culinary courses. I am proud to say that my two girls are cooking delicious food in their own homes.

You might want to check out their latest courses for March

This March, The Maya Kitchen offers classes on the basics of baking and cooking plus specialty courses on pies, quiche and cupcakes.

Basic Baking is on March 1-4 and March 15-18, Tuesday to Friday, 9am-2pm for P7,000. The course focuses on Basic Baking Techniques applicable to small and commercial scale production of recipes and formulations of quick breads, pies, cookies, cakes and other bread varieties.

Basic Culinary is on March 8-11 and March 29-April 1, Tuesday to Friday, 9am-3pm for P8,000. The course includes Cooking Fundamentals and International Standard Techniques of meal preparation from soup, salad, pasta, main courses, sandwiches to desserts for Home and Institutional Scale Kitchens with workshop.

Cupcake Baking and Decorating with Fondant Toppers is on March 12, Saturday, 9am-1pm. Learn how to bake and decorate Green Tea Cupcakes, Sugar-Free Chocolate Cupcakes, Basic Vanilla Cupcakes and Calamansi Cupcakes for P1,750.

Who doesn’t love pies? Learn the basics of pie and quiche making in a hands-on class with group workshop on March 19, Saturday, 9am-1pm for P1,499 at The Maya Kitchen. Recipes include Apple Walnut Crumble, Egg Pie, Vegetable Quiche and Meat Lovers Quiche.

For more information on this and on other course offerings, log on to www.themayakitchen.com [email protected] or visit The Maya Kitchen Culinary Center every Tuesday to Saturday at 8F Liberty Building, 835 A. Arnaiz Avenue (Pasay Road), Makati City or call 8921185 / 892-5011 local 108 / Mobile No. +63929 679 6102. Call and reserve a slot now!

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Menudo Sulipena thumb

Menudo Sulipeña (Oxtail Stew)

I love that Maya Kitchen invites talented Chefs to generously share their recipes of their beloved dishes. It was Chef Gene Gonzalez’ turn at The Maya Kitchen Culinary Elite Series when he presented recipes near and dear to him. He shared this delicious dish, Menudo Sulipeña, a slow simmered dish of oxtail, ham and Chorizo Bilbao with a dash of brandy. Just reading the list of ingredients will make you realize that this dish is truly remarkable.

Menudo Sulipena thumb

Menudo or “little stew” refers to a common, everyday dish of slow-simmered bits of a variety of meats, such as tripe (in Mexican menudo), or ground or cubed pork mixed with potatoes. In Pampanga, common menudo is never complete without tidbits of liver or heart. Menudo Sulipeña however, is an oxtail stew or braise decadent enough to grace a banquet. The dish reflects the extravagance of that time though it carries the “humble” name, menudo.

One advice. Purchase the oxtail from a reputable dealer because strong, undesirable odors are often present in improperly cleaned or processed oxtails.

~1 kilo oxtail cleaned and washed
~ 2 tablespoons butter
~ 3 tablespoons olive oil
~ 1 head garlic, chopped
~ 1 medium onion, chopped
~ 1 red pepper, seeded and roasted
~ 1 green pepper, seeded and roasted
~ Dash of paprika picante
~ ½ cup ham, cubed
~ ½ cup sliced chorizo Bilbao (Spanish sausage)
~ 1 cup tomato sauce
~ 1 tablespoon tomato paste
~ 1 tablespoon cooked garbanzos (chick peas)
~ 1 tablespoon Spanish brandy
~ Salt and pepper

1) Pressure cook oxtail 20-25 minutes or simmer with enough water to cover until tender. Debone and cut into ½- inch cubes. Set the stock aside.

2) In a casserole, heat butter and olive oil. Sauté garlic and onion, then add red and green peppers and paprika. Stir fry 2-3 minutes.

3) Add oxtail, ham, chorizo, tomato sauce and tomato paste. Add stock and simmer over low fire about 10 minutes.

4) Add garbanzos and brandy. Season with salt and pepper.

Serves 6

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Brazo de Mais small

Brazo de Mais

I am more familiar with Brazo de Mercedes which my mom often baked but Chef Sau del Rosario shared a different twist to this all time favorite dessert at a recent cooking demo for The Maya Kitchen’s Elite Culinary Series.

The “corn-like look” of the meringue is a delight but wait till you taste the filling. Try this recipe

Brazo de Mais small

Ingredients
For the Meringue:
8 egg whites
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
¾ cup sugar
3 tablespoons confectioner’s sugar


For the Filling:

8 egg yolks
1 cup canned corn kernels, drained
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup condensed milk
1 tablespoon MAYA Cornstarch, dispersed in 1 tablespoon water

Procedure

For the Meringue:

Preheat the oven at 350°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment or wax paper and grease with butter. In a mixing bowl, beat the egg whites with cream of tartar until foamy. Add sugars gradually while continuing to beat until the mixture stands in stiff peaks. Do not overbeat. Spread meringue evenly on prepared baking sheet and bake for about 20 minutes or until top is medium brown. Allow to cool.

Tip: To give the meringue a “corn-like look”, use a piping bag and shape the meringue into strips, making small contours that would look like corn kernels when baked.

For the Filling:
In a sauce pan, mix the egg yolks, corn, vanilla, and condensed milk. Cook over low heat while stirring constantly. Thicken with cornstarch slurry.

To Assemble:
Sprinkle the meringue with confectioner’s sugar then top with wax paper. Flip the baking sheet and remove the wax paper lining. Spread the mais filling on top of the egg white, then roll.

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lechon sisig

Lechon Sisig

Remember the Lechon Sinigang from our lechon leftovers? Well, this time around, I prepared the Lechon Sisig from leftover lechon head. Please be aware that this dish is high in cholesterol.

lechon

My Lechon Sisig version is similar to the sisig of Trellis which I first tasted over 30 years ago. Trellis is known to be the first to develop Sisig in Manila.

lechon sisig

Here is my recipe:

Ingredients

500 grams lechon head, minced (You will get around 10 cups worth of minced skin, ears, snout, cheeks from the Lechon head,)
1 tablespoon minced garlic
2 large yellow onion (I prefer more )
1 tablespoon oil
1 tsp salt
1/2 tbsps soy sauce
3 calamansi
1/2 tsp ground black pepper
1 tsp hot sauce
2 siling labuyo (red and green), cut into pieces for garnishing

Procedure:
1. Heat oil. Saute garlic till brown then add onions and then cook for 2 minutes or until soft.
2, Add the minced lechon meat. Stir.
3. Add the soy sauce, salt, and pepper. Stir. Continue cooking for 5 more minutes.
4. Then sprinkle the siling labuyo. Stir .
5.. Transfer to a platter. Serve with calamansi.

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lechon sinigang

Sinigang na Lechon

lechon

Christmas lunch is not complete without a lechon. My husband orders the Lechon Paella from Lydia’s lechon. It is really yummy. Unfortunately , we cannot consume all of it. I normally love Paksiw lechon but this time around, I used the Lechon leftovers for Sinigang na Lechon. You can use your usual sinigang recipe or use the following recipe:

lechon sinigang

Ingredients:

2 cups rice washing
250 grams tamarind, boiled and juices extracted
3 pcs onions, quartered
4 pcs tomatoes, quartered
2 pcs gabi, quartered
1 kg lechon meat and skin cut into onw-inch pieces
2 pcs green long sili
1 pc radish, sliced
4 pcs okra
1/2 bundle sitaw, sliced
1/2 bundle kangkong, sliced

Procedure:

1. Bring to boil rice washing in a pot, and add the lechon portions.

2. Add onions, gabi, tomatoes, and reduce heat to simmer until lechon meat is tender.

2. Once gabi is tender, mash half of it to thicken the sauce.

3. Add sili, okra , radish, eggplant, and then let this simmer.

5. Add sitaw and kangkong. Stir well and let this simmer for a few more minutes

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california cheeses

10 ways to prepare noche buena dishes with California Cheese

california cheese platter

Will you be using cheese for your Christmas dinner? I will be preparing Chicken Cannelloni and fondue for our dinner and lunch menu. If you want ideas for a noche buena with cheese as an ingredient, here are some of my recipes. Click on each link.

1. Filipino style spaghetti
2. Cheezy beef patatas
3. A Raclette dinner
4. Lasagna with Bechamel Sauce
5. Chicken Cannelloni
6. Malunngay and cheese dip
7. Macaroni and Cheese overload
8. Cheese Fondue
9. Blinis Shrimp Torte Canapés and Cheesecake crunch bites
10. Chicken Cordon Bleu

When you shop in any leading supermarkets, you will discover that there are different Califorina Cheeses to give you more flavor to your Pinoy holiday dishes this year. California Cheese, served on a platter and paired with your favorite wine is great for  conversation.  My family and I often use a variety of cheeses in our noche buena table not just Queso de bola.  Incorporate California Cheese in your favorite Christmas dish and it can warm your family’s heart with its comforting creaminess.

california cheeses from california milk advisory board

 

While shopping today, I discovered South Supermarket Pasig displayed California Cheeses.

california cheese at south supermarket

Just what is the secret of California Cheese? The answer: California milk produced by happy cows. “The climate of California and the specialized care given by farmers to their cows allow their milk to attain its premium quality,” said Ms. Reji Retugal-Onal, USPB Country Representative.

 

California is the largest farming state and leading milk producer in the US, leading the nation in the production of fluid milk, butter, ice cream and non-fat dry milk. Of all the state’s milk and milk product categories, California Cheese is the largest and fastest growing category. California has been producing cheese for as long as it has been making wine – more than 200 years and is the 2nd largest cheese and yogurt maker in the US.

How do you know find the California Cheese that is right for your needs? Here is a guide.

california cheese mozzarella

  • Fresh: these lovely cheeses have not been aged or ripened, retaining much of the mild flavor of fresh milk. Cottage cheese, Mascarpone, Mozzarella (water-packed) and Ricotta are some of the more familiar examples. I use mozzarella cheese to top lasagana and Cannelloni.

califorina cheese cheddar

  • Semi-Hard: the broadest range of varieties and style, these cheeses include many of what we commonly refer to as “table cheeses.” They can be anywhere from soft and creamy, having been aged only a few weeks, to moderately firm, aged a month or more. Their flavors also vary, giving you a wide array to choose from. Examples include Cheddar, Feta and Gouda.

california cheddar cheese

  • Soft & Soft-Ripened: delicate and delicious, these cheeses are typically mild when young and develop a fuller flavor with age, often becoming softer and creamier in the process. Brie is an example of this type. Most of its varieties are mild and rich, although Oaxaca and Schloss can have strong flavors.

 

  • Very Hard: Beauty often comes with age and aged cheeses are no exception. These are the cheeses that are hard enough to grate or crumble. While the Dry Jack and the Enchilado Anejo can be mild, the Asiago, Cotija and Romano can have sharp or strong flavors.

 

  • Hispanic Style: a broad family of cheeses that reflect the cheesemaking styles and traditions brought to California from Mexico, Central and South America and Spain. You can find varieties that are mild and mellow, as well as ones that are strong and pungent.

califorina monterrey jack

  • Spiced & Flavored: packed with flavor, these are natural cheeses to which a cheesemaker has added natural spices, herbs, and/or vegetable for flavor. You can find flavored versions of Brie, Cheddar, Feta, Gouda, Havarti, Mozzarella, Monterey Jack, Panela and Provolone.

california cheeses

No matter which variety you choose, you can be assured that it is Real California Cheese made with California Milk if it carries the Real California Milk seal. It is a certification mark that assures consumers they are purchasing natural cheese, made in California exclusively with California milk.

I love that there is an ample supply at the grocery since cheese will always be a primary ingredient not only on Christmas dinners but in most special occasion dishes.

Check out facebook.com/RealCaliforniaMilk , follow them on twitter at @RealCalifMilk and instagram at instagram.com/RealCalifMilk

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Pinoy Cooking, Filipino Food and other Food Recipes